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Help with VNC? Problem that No one will most likely be able to fix

This is a discussion on Help with VNC? Problem that No one will most likely be able to fix within the Tech Support forums, part of the Knight Online (ko4life.com) category; Hey guys, I have a question(for once). I have 2 computers at my work that have VNC server installed, and ...
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  1. #1
    Hustlin' Senior Member kgllegend's Avatar
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    Hey guys, I have a question(for once).
    I have 2 computers at my work that have VNC server installed, and they are running off the same network, which means they have the same External IP. I forwarded the port 5900(VNC's TCP/UDP port) on Internal IP(192.168.2.100) and it works when I try to connect from my house. Problem is, my work ISP assigned these computers 5 different IP's, and every time the computer is shut off, the internal IP changes which makes me have to go back and re forward port 5900 to IP range(192.168.2.100- 192.168.2.105).
    Problem is, there is no Router in the market that allows you to forward the same port to two different IP's. For example, I can't forward port 5900 to IP 192.168.2.101 and 192.168.2.102 at the same time. I tried turning off DHCP and assigning a custom IP that my ISP provided me, unticking Automatically obtain an IP and manually inputting an IP, and that still didn't work. Is there any way that you guys know of in where I can set two different IP's to the same port? Thanks!
    ~Legend

  2. #2
    bazzeeka
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    u can change it so the computers IP[internal] doesnt change if its running Xp

  3. #3
    Hustlin' Senior Member kgllegend's Avatar
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    Yes, that's what turning off DHCP does, what you do is you disable DHCP on your computer, and then you go into your TCP/ICP properties and you manually input the IP you have been assigned by your ISP.


    Never mind, I'm just gonna keep having someone at work turn off the computer and eventually, (5 restarts maximum) the internal IP will change to the one that has been forwarded to port 5900. And I'll do this whenever I need to repair the computers remotely.

  4. #4
    cerebus
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    Yes, that's what turning off DHCP does, what you do is you disable DHCP on your computer, and then you go into your TCP/ICP properties and you manually input the IP you have been assigned by your ISP.
    Never mind, I'm just gonna keep having someone at work turn off the computer and eventually, (5 restarts maximum) the internal IP will change to the one that has been forwarded to port 5900. And I'll do this whenever I need to repair the computers remotely.[/b]
    If you have one external IP, changing your computers IP to the one provided by your ISP will result in your router and that computer having the same IP. You need to assign it a local IP, set the gateway and be sure that your router accepts the IP range. Alternatively theres an option in your router admin to always assign the same IP to a certain mac adress.

  5. #5
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    Set manual IPs to your internal network and set different VNC access ports to each of your VNC servers (hopefully your VNC server allows that, I know TightVNC does). This way you'll be able to make your router pass the data to correct server. Then it's just a matter of correctly setting your VNC client IP and port to access individual server.

    Alternative solution is possible if your router can switch the port of the incoming data. In this case both VNC servers can still have 5900 port set, but you program a rule that maps incoming data from port 5900 to one server/ port 5900, and if the incoming data is on port 5901 (for example) it gets routed to second server/ port 5900 again.

  6. #6
    bazzeeka
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    must have a nice connection to remolty connect to a pc with VNC from home or do u live close to work :P i cant remeber shit about VNC i used it at high school once to fuk around with pplz computers lol

  7. #7
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    Im not sure if im getting this right, but if your ISP is using ICS (Microsoft's internet connection sharing) computers on LAN will have their "domains" like this computer_name.mshome.net (example. PC1.mshome.net ). Hope you can use that, and not the dynamic IP.
    btw. "repair connection" usually assign a new IP , so u dont need to restart.

  8. #8
    bazzeeka
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    Im not sure if im getting this right, but if your ISP is using ICS (Microsoft's internet connection sharing) computers on LAN will have their "domains" like this computer_name.mshome.net (example. PC1.mshome.net ). Hope you can use that, and not the dynamic IP.
    btw. "repair connection" usually assign a new IP , so u dont need to restart.[/b]

    that is exactly home my home network is setup and everytime a computer restarts it gets a new internal IP i ,think so nothing has the same ip or the network clash's and goes down . i am using ICS between 3 computers

  9. #9
    Senior Member festo's Avatar
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    dmz

  10. #10
    Senior Member festo's Avatar
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    Im not sure if im getting this right, but if your ISP is using ICS (Microsoft's internet connection sharing) computers on LAN will have their "domains" like this computer_name.mshome.net (example. PC1.mshome.net ). Hope you can use that, and not the dynamic IP.
    btw. "repair connection" usually assign a new IP , so u dont need to restart.[/b]
    Dont use ICS !

  11. #11
    h4x0r Admin Devile's Avatar
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    Dont get it.

    What does your ISP has to do with internal/private IP addresses? U can use 1.1.1.1 if u want internally. Also I dont get why static IPs dont work? As long as u use an IP inside your DHCP scope (and no other PCs is using the same IP) and u have your router IP as gateway, it should work. If it doesnt, there's something going on with that router.

    Also, DHCP changes IPs with a certain frequency which is called LEASE. Looks like in your case that lease is pretty short and renews IPs on every renew request. If u can set this up, increase the lease so the IP changes in a longer period or u can even make that MAC address pick the same IP always. Thats part of DHCP normal features. I guess your router is the one providing the DHCP service. If the router DHCP service cant be configured, just disable it, and setup your own DHCP.

    U cant have the same port forwarded to 2 IPs, but u can always use 2 ports as suggested. Use port 5900 for 192.168.2.100, 5901 for 192.168.2.101, etc. Or even better, NAT each external IP to a particular internal, so u use 5900 for all but different external IPs for each one.

    PS: Even if the ISP is lame enough to use ICS, u can still use static IPs. I use that at home.

  12. #12
    Senior Member festo's Avatar
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    easy answer DMZ!!!! but its the dodgy answer!!

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